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Green Growing: A Model for Food Sovereignty and Sustainability

Grades 9-10
Developed by Maggie Pulver, Ho’ala School

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Overview

An engaging, hands-on and inquiry based curriculum that delves into the questions of where our food comes from, and how we, as communities, can reclaim our independence and sustainability in food production. By designing and building their own aquaponics systems, students will learn the meaning and importance of biomimicry in creating nutrient cycles, flow systems, water quality, and conservation of energy and matter that work with the innate design of nature. They will also learn about issues of sustainability and food sovereignty, as well as the societal and environmental impacts of agricultural and food production systems. This empowering unit encourages students to thrive, not only by growing their own food sustainably, but also by sharing knowledge with their communities and supporting non-profit organizations.

Learning Objectives

Enduring Understandings

  • Meaning and importance of food sovereignty through the lens of food justice and sustainability
  • Interdependence of the living world through the transfer and conservation of matter and energy, as
    they flow and cycle through nature
  • Meaning and importance of using biomimicry in engineering and design, in reference to nutrient cycles, flow systems, water quality, conservation of mass and matter, biosystems, and sustainability

Essential Questions

  • Where does food come from, why is this important, and why should I care?
  • How can we be more energy independent and sustainable in our local food production?

Standard Benchmarks and Values

Science (Next Generation Science Standards)

Matter and Energy in Organisms and Ecosystems

• LS1-5 Use a model to illustrate how photosynthesis transforms light energy into stored chemical energy
• LS1-6 Construct and revise and explanation based on evidence for how carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen from 
sugar molecules combine with other elements to form amino acids and/or other large carbon based molecules.
• LS1-7 Use a model to illustrate that cellular respiration is a chemical process whereby the bonds of food 
molecules and oxygen molecules are broken and the bonds in new compounds are formed resulting in a net transfer of energy
• LS2-3 Construct and revise an explanation based on evidence for the cycling of matter and flow of energy in aerobic and anaerobic conditions
• LS2-5 Develop a model to illustrate the role of photosynthesis and cellular respiration in the cycling of carbon among the biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and geosphere

Independent Relationships in Ecosystems


• LS2-1 Use mathematical and/or computational representations to support explanations of factors that affect 
carrying capacity of ecosystems at different scales

Human Impacts


• ESS3-4 Evaluate or refine a technological solution that reduces impacts of human activities on natural 
systems

Language Arts

Literacy


• RST.9-10.3 Follow precisely a complex multistep procedure when carrying out experiments or tasks.

Writing

• WHST.9-10.2 Write informative and explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures and experiments, or technical processes.
• WHST.9-10.6 Use technology to produce, publish, and update individual and shared writing projects, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically. 
Nā Honua Mauli Ola (NHMO)

Cultural Pathways

• `Ike `Ōlelo: Language Pathway #11 Utilize Hawaiian language reference materials
• `Ike Ola Pono: Wellness Pathway #4 Make healthy choices in their lifestyle that contributes to the wholeness and well-being of themselves and         others
• `Ike Pikoȳu: Personal Connection Pathway #1 Design and implement projects demonstrating kuleana
• `Ike Na`auao: Intellectual Pathway #15 Share with others as an ongoing process of learning and teaching
• `Ike Hoȳokō: Applied Achievement Pathway #2 Demonstrate the use of aquired knowledge through 
application

Critical Skills and Concepts

Students will be able to synthesize and present information, claims and findings from multiple sources, using diagramming, modeling, graphics, design, technology, writing, revising and public speaking to explain:

  • the need for /role of different types of food production systems, food technologies, and growing techniques in human society
  • environmental justice and it’s significance in modern and indigenous societies
  • food sovereignty and it’s significance in modern and indigenous societies
  • sustainbility and it’s significance in food production in modern and indigenous societies
  • agriculture and it’s significance in food production in modern and indigenous societies
  • aquaculture and it’s significant in food production, in modern and indigenous societies, with specific  attention to Native Hawaiian methods and traditions
  • energy independence and it’s significance in food production in modern and indigenous societies
  • sustainable food production methods
  • the process and need for nutrient cycling, and it’s effect on food production methods and practices
  • the significance of staple crops, fruits, vegetables, medicinal and other functional plants (indigenous, modern)

Students will be able to work as a team to design and implement a project that will:

  • support the efforts of a local non-proft organization
  • demonstrate the principal of “think global / act local”
  • provide them with an opportunity to share their work with the larger community
  • successfully grow and distribute as much edible food or useful produce as possible using organic aquaponic and natural farming methods
  • teach other students and community members about food sovereignty, energy (in)dependence, food technologies, and environmental justice
Unit Map

Learning Plan

Building/Activating the Background

1. Start with a Bioneers Radio broadcast from 2012, Conspiracy of Ancestors: The Indigeniety Essentials. Discuss the speech with the class, focusing on the essential questions, and how they are answered in terms of modern and indigenous societies.

2. Students are assigned four articles to read over a week:

Feeding the World –  an article about the effects of agriculture on the natural environment,

Our Good Earth by Charles C. Mann

“The Nutritional Benefits of Eating Locally”, UH CTHAR publication

Food Security, Food Justice, or Food Sovereignty? By Eric Holt Gimenez

They will answer questions through a Google Form to help assess completion and reading comprehension. Then the students come to class and discuss the articles through the lens of the essential questions, focusing on the purpose, significance and enduring legacy of growing green.

3. The next day, students complete an activity where they solidify their understandings of the significant terms from the readings (food miles, biodiesel, stewardship, sustainability, fair trade, community supported agriculture (CSA), carbon footprint, food system, food production, food justice, food security, food sovereignty, local, fossil fuels, genetically modified organisms (GMO), organic). The words are written on index cards, and then affixed to the backs of students in a random order. Students then go around and ask each other questions to try and identify the word they are wearing. They cannot ask for the word specifically. The clues must support learning the vocabulary. This activity could be done in Hawaiian and English. Finally, they complete an SCR (short constructive response) of their understanding of why it is important to know where your food comes from, using evidence from the articles, conversation and activity.

4. As a homework assignment, students watch the TEDvideos, JaynePointer: Life in Biosphere 2 and Janine Benyus: Biomimicry in Action, and then answer questions to stimulate and guide thinking of biomimicry in engineering and design. The next day in class, students discuss the video and the teacher introduces the quarter project aims, which are the authentic performance tasks. The overall project expectations are briefly described, and the first long-term individual project rubric (seed sprouting/plant diary) is assigned.

Deepening the Understanding

5. Plants. Class will be engaged into the project by sprouting seeds for edible, medicinal, or functional plants to serve as a source of information in learning about the synthesis of chemical compounds from light energy, as well as the process of photosynthesis. During class, students will complete an assessment via a Google Form to help set a baseline for their knowledge on nutrient cycling, photosynthesis, and cellular respiration prior to the unit.

6. For homework students will read from their textbook and watch several lecture videos from iTunesU and Khan Academy Biology about the chemical processes of photosynthesis. (These can also be found on YouTube.) They will complete a reading comprehension assessment on a Google Form before coming to class. During the next few classes, the students work together to draw models and diagrams of the chemical reactions of photosynthesis in large poster-sized format to hang in the class room.

7. As part of the Authentic Performance Task, students will create individual slide shows of photos and explanatory writing of their seed’s journey using the appropriate unit vocabulary and concepts, diagraming the different parts of the seed, seedling, and plant, as well as modeling photosynthesis and the synthesis of complex compounds from carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. This will be done throughout the quarter. The more detailed the better. These will be used in the creation and production of the final group presentations.

8. Students will read from the text book and watch videos from Khan Academy Biologyon iTunesU about the the chemical process of respiration (Video 1Video 2, Video 3) and how it differs in anaerobic and aerobic conditions. Students will then work together to model and diagram the role that cellular respiration and other biochemical processes play in different aerobic and anaerobic nutrient cycling systems, specifically in aquatic environments, in poster-sized format to be hung in the classroom.

9. Nutrient Cycling Systems. Students will work in groups to research different nutrient cycling systems present in the natural environment (water, carbon, nitrogen), and how these are “mimicked” by human societies (indigenous, modern, different places). They will then present their findings to the class using a pre-formed template provided by the teacher.

10. Students will complete a post-assessment to determine the change in knowledge and/or skills regarding photosynthesis, cellular respiration, and nutrient cycling.

11. Aquaponics. The teacher will introduce the concept of aquaponics to the class using historical examples from indigenous populations, specifically Native Hawaiian methods and techniques. Students will take a learning journey to one of the local fishpond projects (depending on location, scheduling availability and time of year; possible sites on O’ahu include He’eia, Waikaloa, and Loko Ea). The teacher then introduces existing specific-case modern projects going on around Hawai’i and the world (Ho’ala 3rd and 4th grade, CTHAR, local fishponds, Hikianalia Green Growing Project, etc). Students will then work in small groups to research different types of aquaponic and aeroponic grow systems, and decide which types of systems they would like to install in the school Peace Garden. The student-designed systems must be energy independent and sustainable. Students will write an SCR comparing and contrasting modern and indigenous systems.

12. Students will work in groups to start and maintain a circulating aquaponics system with tilapia or shrimp (students can choose) and edible local food, medicinal, or functional plants (the plants sprouted in the first lesson should be used; if this is not possible (i.e., seeds didn’t survive, timing didn’t line up, etc) purchase locally grown plants. The students will use their previous knowledge about nutrient cycling to establish a healthy and safe home for the animals, while trying to maximizing the growth of the food crops. They will use the animals’ and plants’ growth as models to illustrate the chemical processes of photosynthesis, cellular respiration, and nutrient cycling, whereby the bonds of food molecules and oxygen molecules are broken and the bonds in new compounds are formed resulting in a net transfer of matter and energy. Students will maintain regular observations of their systems, recording data on plant and fish growth, fruit production, food consumption, sunlight exposure, water quality and chemical levels in their digital lab journal. This will serve as data and content for their final performance tasks.

Applying the Learning

13. As part of the authentic performance task, groups will collaborate to write an academic report of the groups project, using appropriate key terms and concepts. The report must include a detailed step-by- step procedure and a summary of the project experience with regard to the level of food production. The group must also include an explanation based on evidence from the project for how plants use photosynthesis to transfer solar energy into chemical energy, how cellular respiration transfers the chemical energy stored in food into the energy used by organisms, and how carbon, nitrogen and oxygen from molecules combine with other elements to form amino acids and/or other large carbon based molecules. Finally, groups must also include an explanation of the different nutrient cycles present in the aquaponics system, and how they model what is occurring in the natural environment. The report will be published in poster format and shared both in the school science classroom and at a local farmer’s market event in the community. Students will take the formative feedback from peers and teacher during the draft process, as well as their own critical analysis and evaluation, to improve report and resubmit a final draft.

14. For the Authentic Performance Task, students will create a video presentation explaining the development and implementation of their project, as well as the results of the growing strategies they chose, using writing, models, diagrams, tables, photos, videos, and speaking. Students will emphasize the importance of their project in propagating indigenous knowledge and emulating sustainable food production, while also reducing the human impact on natural systems. The video will also include a depiction of their aquaponics system as a model illustrating the role of photosynthesis, cellular respiration, protein synthesis and breakdown in the cycling of elements and compounds among the biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and geosphere and explain how it can help to reduce the impact of commercial food production systems. Finally, they will include a critical analysis of the project and any unexpected events that might have occurred.

15. Students will present their final projects on a website shared through the school domain, explaining how their growing system works, and it’s overall environmental impact, as well as explain why being able to grow food and knowing how to grow food on a more local level is important.

16. Students will complete a self-assessment to evaluate their performance both individually and as part of the larger group. They will also complete a group evaluation to give feedback to the instructor regarding the general challenges, strengths, and functionality of the group.

17. As a class, the students discuss the articles from the beginning of the unit and essential questions again, and how they relate to the possibilities present in new food growing technologies, using aquaponics as an example. Then students work in small groups to create charts or diagrams that illustrate the significance of food miles in terms of food sovereignty, energy use, environmental impact, efficiency, food safety, and animal rights. Individually, students will write an SCR on their own experience of the essential questions, with regard to food sovereignty, energy use, environmental impact, efficiency, food safety, and animal rights.

18. Students will grow food plants and raise fish for themselves, their families, and their community. They will donate a portion of their yield to the crews of Hikianalia and Hokule`a during the Worldwide Voyage.

Assessment

Authentic Performance Task

  • Groups will collaborate to write an academic report of the group’s project. The report must include a detailed step-by- step procedure and a summary of the project experience with regard to the level of food production.
  •  Students will create a video presentation explaining the development and implementation of their project. Students will emphasize the importance of their project in propagating indigenous knowledge and emulating sustainable food production, while also reducing the human impact on natural systems.
  • Students will present their final projects on a website shared through the school domain, explaining how their growing system works, and it’s overall environmental impact, as well as explain why being able to grow food and knowing how to grow food on a more local level is important.
  • Students will grow food plants and raise fish for themselves, their families, and their community. They will donate a portion of their yield to the crews of Hikianalia and Hōkūle`a during the Worldwide Voyage.

Authentic Audience

  • Students will share their work with their classmates during instructional time
  • Students will share their presentation with the greater school community at a Ho‘ala School Gathering
  • Students will share their project through a group-developed video that will be posted on the class website and shared through the school domain

Other Evidence

  • Student presentations, videos, models, diagrams, and SCR’s

Rubrics

Standard Benchmarks Skills Concepts Assessment Not yet within expectations 1 Point Approaching Expectations 2 Points Meets Expectations at a Beginner Level 3 Points Fully Meets Expectations 4 Points Exceeds Expectations 5 Points
LS1-5 Use a model to illustrate howphotosynthesis transforms light energy into stored chemical energy -Synthesizing content and ideas from multiple sources -Diagraming and modeling scientific information -Appropriate use of technology to enhance project quality -Energy flows through systems being transferred through different forms and is conserved in the process Individual visual arts project diagramming and explaining the process of photosynthesis through the sprouting and growth of a plant from seed. Model is not complete or labeled, and does not include most of the relevant steps for the process. The information presented is inaccurate. Model is labeled but does not include many of the relevant steps for the process. The steps for the process may be incorrect or in the wrong order. The information presented may or may not be accurate. Model is labeled and includes most of the relevant steps for the process. The information presented is mostly accurate. Model includes all relevant steps for the process, and is creative. The model is also labeled and explained in detail with information that is mostly accurate. Model includes all relevant steps for the process and is creative, and unique. The model is labeled and explained in detail with information that is 100% accurate.
LS1-6 Construct and revise andexplanation based on evidence for how carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen from sugar molecules combine with other elements to form amino acids and/or other large carbon based molecules. -Synthesizing content and ideas from multiple sources -Constructing, editing and revising scientific arguments and conclusions based on peer and teacher feedback -Matter is cycled through systems and is conserved in the process Individual short constructive response assignment with two drafts (rough and final) assessed based on content, organization, style and fluency. The rough draft is both peer and teacher evaluated. The final response is off topic or unreasonable. The response tends to be unfocsed and disorganized; there may be severe problems with fluency and/or consistency. Ideas may not be related to the topic specified in the prompt. Details and/or anecdotes may be irrelevant or too insufficient for the reader to construct meaning. Word choices may not support the content, be repetitive or inaccurate. There may be errors in language usage, spelling, or mechanics may be severe. One or more of the following problems is present. The response does not maintain focus or organization throughout. Ideas are minimally related to the purpose specified in the prompt; the reader must make inferences based on sketchy details and inaccurate or nonspecific word choice. There may be some serious errors in language usage, spelling, or mechanics. One or more of the following problems is present. The response is clear and focused. Ideas are related to the purpose specified in the prompt but may be sketchy or overly general. Relevant details and/or anecdontes and word choice support the topic, but may be limited. Any errors in language usage, spelling, and mechanics, if present, do not impede meaning. One or more of the following problems may be present. The response is clear, focused, and developed with respect the prompt. Relevant details and/or anecdontes and word choice support and enrich the central idea or topic fully. Any errors in language usage, spelling, and mechanics, if present, do not impede meaning.
Standard Benchmarks Skills Concepts Assessment Not yet within expectations 1 Point Approaching Expectations 2 Points Meets Expectations at a Beginner Level 3 Points Fully Meets Expectations 4 Points Exceeds Expectations 5 Points
LS1-7 Use a model to illustrate thatcellular respiration is a chemical process whereby the bonds of food molecules and oxygen molecules are broken and the bonds in new compounds are formed resulting in a net transfer of energy -Synthesizing content and ideas from multiple sources -Diagraming and modeling scientific information -Appropriate use of technology to enhance project quality -Energy flows through systems being transferred through different forms and is conserved in the process-Matter is cycled through systems and is conserved in the process Small group visual arts project diagramming and explaining the process of cellular respiration using the animals in an aquaponics system, or other manmade ecosystem as a the source for the model. Model is not complete or labeled, and does not include most of the relevant steps for the process. The information presented is inaccurate. Model is labeled but does not include many of the relevant steps for the process. The steps for the process may be incorrect or in the wrong order. The information presented may or may not be accurate. Model is labeled and includes most of the relevant steps for the process. The information presented is mostly accurate. Model includes all relevant steps for the process, and is creative. The model is also labeled and explained in detail with information that is mostly accurate. Model includes all relevant steps for the process and is creative, and unique. The model is labeled and explained in detail with information that is 100% accurate.
LS2-3 Construct and revise anexplanation based on evidence for the cycling of matter and flow of energy in aerobic and anaerobic conditions -Synthesizing content and ideas from multiple sources -Constructing, editing and revising scientific arguments and conclusions based on peer and teacher feedback -Energy flows through systems being transferred through different forms and is conserved in the process-Matter is cycled through systems and is conserved in the process Small group presentation with a visual aid component diagramming and explaining the process of cellular respiration using the animals in an aquaponics system, or other manmade ecosystem as a the source for the model. Visual aid is not complete or labeled, and does not include most of the relevant steps for the process. The information in the presentation is inaccurate. Visual aid is labeled but does not include many of the relevant steps for the process. The steps for the process may be incorrect or in the wrong order. The information in the presentation may or may not be accurate. Visual aid is labeled and includes most of the relevant steps for the process. The information in the presentation is mostly accurate. Visual aid includes all relevant steps for the process, and is creative. The model is also labeled and explained in detail with information in the presentation is mostly accurate. Visual aid includes all relevant steps for the process and is creative, and unique. The visual is labeled and explained in detail during the presentation with information that is 100% accurate.
Standard Benchmarks Skills Concepts Assessment Not yet within expectations 1 Point Approaching Expectations 2 Points Meets Expectations at a Beginner Level 3 Points Fully Meets Expectations 4 Points Exceeds Expectations 5 Points
LS2-5 Develop a model to illustratethe role of photosynthesis and cellular respiration in the cycling of carbon among the biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and geosphere -Synthesizing content and ideas from multiple sources -Diagraming and modeling scientific information -Appropriate use of technology to enhance project quality -Energy flows through systems being transferred through different forms and is conserved in the process-Matter is cycled through systems and is conserved in the process Small group research project report and presentation with a visual aid component diagramming and explaining the role of photosynthesis and cellular respiration in the cycling of nutrients among the biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and geosphere. Project report or presentation are inaccurate and incomplete. Project report or presentation tends to be unfocsed and disorganized. Ideas presented may not be related to the project. Details may be irrelevant or too insufficient for the reader to understanding the research findings. Word choices may not support the content, be repetitive or inaccurate. There may be errors in language usage, spelling, or mechanics may be severe. One or more of the following problems is present. Project report or presentation does not maintain focus or organization throughout. Ideas are minimally related to the purpose specified in the prompt; the reader must make inferences based on sketchy details and inaccurate or nonspecific word choice. There may be some serious errors in language usage, spelling, or mechanics. One or more of the following problems is present. Project report or presentation is clear and focused. Ideas are related to the purpose specified in the prompt but may be sketchy or overly general. Relevant details and/or anecdontes and word choice support the topic, but may be limited. Any errors in language usage, spelling, and mechanics, if present, do not impede meaning. One or more of the following problems may be present. Project report or presentation is clear, focused, and developed with respect the prompt. Relevant details and/or anecdontes and word choice support and enrich the central idea or topic fully. Any errors in language usage, spelling, and mechanics, if present, do not impede meaning.
ESS3-4 Evaluate or refine atechnological solution that reduces impacts of human activities on natural systems -Critical thinking and analysis-Editing and refining a thought process or idea
-Malama-Aloha
-Humans must be aware of their impact on the natural environment -Humans have the ability to change their impact on the natural environment
-Review and editing is part of the problem- solving process
Final project group report from the Authentic Performance Task includes a critical analysis of the project and provides possible changes or improvements to make it more successful. Critical analysis is weak or lacking. It has no significant poitns, and does not identify any challenges or strengths. It also does not offer suggestions for the future. Critical analysis is weak but one or two key points were identified. Challenges and strengths are mentions, but not at length. Suggestions for future endeavors may or may not be present. Critical analysis is sound, identifying at least 3 key points. Challenges and strengths are addressed breifly, and at least one suggestion is made for future endeavors. Critical analysis is solid, identifying at least 3 key points and providing explanations for the challenges and successes, and offering at least one suggestion for future endeavors. Critical analysis is strong, identifying more than 3 key points, providing explanations for the challenges and successes, and offering suggestions for future endeavors.
Standard Benchmarks Skills Concepts Assessment Not yet within expectations 1 Point Approaching Expectations 2 Points Meets Expectations at a Beginner Level 3 Points Fully Meets Expectations 4 Points Exceeds Expectations 5 Points
WHST.9-10.2 Write informative andexplanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific or technical information and knowledge, scientific procedures and experiments, or technical processes. -Synthesizing content and ideas from multiple sources -Revising to create quality products that clarify information -Constructing, editing and revising scientific arguments and conclusions based on peer and teacher feedback -Writing is a skill that spans all disciplines, including science. -Scientific writing must have accurate content and be organized. It must also meet the grade level requirements for style and fluency. -Project reports -SCR’s The final draft assignment is off topic or unreasonable. The final draft tends to be unfocsed and disorganized; there may be severe problems with fluency and/or consistency. Ideas may not be related to the topic specified in the prompt. Details and/or anecdotes may be irrelevant or too insufficient for the reader to construct meaning. Word choices may not support the content, be repetitive or inaccurate. There may be errors in language usage, spelling, or mechanics may be severe. One or more of the following problems is present. The final draft does not maintain focus or organization throughout. Ideas are minimally related to the purpose specified in the prompt; the reader must make inferences based on sketchy details and inaccurate or nonspecific word choice. There may be some serious errors in language usage, spelling, or mechanics. One or more of the following problems is present. The final draft is clear and focused. Ideas are related to the purpose specified in the prompt but may be sketchy or overly general. Relevant details and/or anecdontes and word choice support the topic, but may be limited. Any errors in language usage, spelling, and mechanics, if present, do not impede meaning. One or more of the following problems may be present. The final draft is clear, focused, and developed with respect the prompt. Relevant details and/or anecdontes and word choice support and enrich the central idea or topic fully. Any errors in language usage, spelling, and mechanics, if present, do not impede meaning.
WHST.9-10.6 Use technology toproduce, publish, and update individual and shared writing projects, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically. -Public speaking -Working in groups -Appropriate use of technology to enhance projects -Creating graphics that represent key concepts-Revising to create quality products that clarify information -Laulima to get large tasks done in a shorter amount of time -Share what you have learned to support the learning of others -Feedback is necessary and important in the revision process Final group report published as a poster and displayed for the school in the science classroom.Final group video presentation of the major findings in the final report. Group poster and/or presentation does not containt the required content from the group report; presentation does not include words, images, and speaking Group poster and/ or presentation includes some of the required content from the group report; presentation includes words, images, and speaking Group poster and/ or presentation is complete and includes most of the required content from the group report; presentation includes words, images, and speaking Group poster and/or presentation is complete and includes all required content from the group report; presentation includes words, videos, images, and speaking Group poster and/or presentation is thorough and complete, including all required content from the group report; presentation is creative, dynamic and engaging, including words, videos, images, and speaking
Standard Benchmarks Skills Concepts Assessment Not yet within expectations 1 Point Approaching Expectations 2 Points Meets Expectations at a Beginner Level 3 Points Fully Meets Expectations 4 Points Exceeds Expectations 5 Points
RST.9-10.3 Follow precisely a complexmultistep procedure when carrying out experiments or tasks. -Following instructions and procedures -Completing multistep tasks -Some jobs are a multistep process that requires specific steps and practices Groups set up aquaponics systems and successfully grow food
Students complete and submit the final project
Group is not able to sucessfully set up and run aquaponics system; group is not able to grow food Group is able to sucessfully set up and run aquaponics system; group is able to grow some food, but not enough for self, home, and community Group is able to sucessfully set up and run aquaponics system; group is able to grow enough food to provide some for self, home, and community Group is able to sucessfully set up and run aquaponics system; group is able to grow the amount of food expected for self, home, and community Group is able to sucessfully set up and run aquaponics system; group is able to grow more food than expected for self, home, and community
`Ike `Ōlelo: Language Pathway #11 Utilize Hawaiian language reference materials -Research and reference-Hawaiian language -Translation -The native language of this place is significant and meaningful
-Using the Hawaiian language allows for connection to culture -Using the Hawaiian language pays respect to the culture and people of this place
Hawaiian language and vocabulary is infused regularly throughout the group report and presentation, with regard to the names of foods, practices, and systems. No Hawaiian vocabulary is present in the report or presentation Some common Hawaiian `ōlelo is presented in the report, the presentation, or both A large amount of common Hawaiian`ōlelo is presented in both the report and presentation A large amount of the food, plant, and aquaculture vocabulary in the report is presented in English and Hawaiian; group presentation has a large amount of common and subject specific Hawaiian `ōlelo All food, plant, and aquaculture vocabulary in the report is presented in English and Hawaiian; group presentation has large amount of common and subject specific Hawaiian `ōlelo
`Ike Pikoȳu: Personal Connection Pathway #1 Design and implement projects demonstrating kuleana -Critical thinking and analysis-Editing and refining a thought process or idea
-Malama-Aloha
-Humans must be aware of their impact on the natural environment -Humans have the ability to change their impact on the natural environment
-Review and editing is part of the problem- solving process
Final project group report from the Authentic Performance Task includes a critical analysis of the project and provides possible changes or improvements to make it more successful. Critical analysis is weak or lacking. It has no significant poitns, and does not identify any challenges or strengths. It also does not offer suggestions for the future. Critical analysis is weak but one or two key points were identified. Challenges and strengths are mentions, but not at length. Suggestions for future endeavors may or may not be present. Critical analysis is sound, identifying at least 3 key points. Challenges and strengths are addressed breifly, and at least one suggestion is made for future endeavors. Critical analysis is solid, identifying at least 3 key points and providing explanations for the challenges and successes, and offering at least one suggestion for future endeavors. Critical analysis is strong, identifying more than 3 key points, providing explanations for the challenges and successes, and offering suggestions for future endeavors.
Standard Benchmarks Skills Concepts Assessment Not yet within expectations 1 Point Approaching Expectations 2 Points Meets Expectations at a Beginner Level 3 Points Fully Meets Expectations 4 Points Exceeds Expectations 5 Points
`Ike Hoȳokō: Applied Achievement Pathway #2 Demonstrate the use of aquired knowledge through application -Design and engineering-Animal care -Plant care -Observation -Data collection -Harvesting -Humans must be aware of their impact on the natural environment -Humans have the ability to change their impact on the natural environment
-Review and editing is part of the problem- solving process
Students design, build and maintain a working aquaponics system that produces a significant yield. -Students are not able to successfully grow food. -Students are able to grow enough food to harvest and experience the food with their class. -Students are able to grow enough food to share with their families. -Students are able to grow enough food to share with their families and the crew of the Worldwide voyage. -Students are able to grow enough food to share with their families, school community, and the crew of the Worldwide voyage.
`Ike Ola Pono: Wellness Pathway #4 Make healthy choices in their lifestyle that contributes to the wholeness and well-being of themselves and others -Laulima -Aloha -Malama -‘ai pono -Ola maika’i -Humans must be aware of their impact on the natural environment -Humans have the ability to change their impact on the natural environment -Community gives humans a sense of significance and belonging Survey of students who choose to implement the practices learned at school at home, encourage their family to implement the practices, and spread the practices and knowledge to outside community. -Students make no attempts to implement the practices or knowledge learned in class at home. -Students attempt to implement the process at home but are not successful. -Students successfully implement some of the practices and knowledge from class at home. -Students successfully implement some of the practices at home, and are also able to encourage their families to participate. -Students successfully implement some of the practices at home with the full support of their families, and are now sharing with their neighbors in the larger community.
`Ike Na`auao: Intellectual Pathway #15 Share with others as an ongoing process oflearning and teaching Final group report published as a poster and displayed for the school in the science classroom.Final group video presentation of the major findings in the final report. Group poster and/or presentation does not containt the required content from the group report; presentation does not include words, images, and speaking Group poster and/ or presentation includes some of the required content from the group report; presentation includes words, images, and speaking Group poster and/ or presentation is complete and includes most of the required content from the group report; presentation includes words, images, and speaking Group poster and/or presentation is complete and includes all required content from the group report; presentation includes words, videos, images, and speaking Group poster and/or presentation is thorough and complete, including all required content from the group report; presentation is creative, dynamic and engaging, including words, videos, images, and speaking
Materials